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Dr. Thomas Anthopoulos
Dr. Thomas Anthopoulos Prof. ​Thomas D. Anthopoulos is a Professor of Material Science and Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, where he has been since January 2017. His research interests are diverse and cover the development and application of novel nano-patterning paradigms and the physics & application of functional materials.

Biography

Prof. ​Thomas D. Anthopoulos is a Professor of Material Science and Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, where he has been since January 2017. He received his B.Eng. and D.Phil. degrees from Staffordshire University in UK. He then spent two years at the University of St. Andrews (UK) where he worked on organic light-emitting diodes before join Philips Research Laboratories (The Netherlands) to work on organic transistors between 2003 and 2006. From 2006 to 2017 he held a faculty position at Imperial College London (UK), first as an EPSRC Advanced Fellow and later as a professor of Experimental Physics. His research interests are diverse and cover the development and application of novel nano-patterning paradigms and the physics & application of functional materials.

All sessions by Dr. Thomas Anthopoulos

  • Day 2Monday, February 26th
Conference
2:00 pm

Advanced hole & electron transport interlayers for solar cell applications

There is currently an immense demand for novel p- and n-type semiconductors that can function as hole & electron transport layers (HTL, ETL respectively) in the emerging field of 3rd generation solar cells. This is primarily due to the significant improvements in device performance demonstrated when suitable HTL/ETL are incorporated between the metallic electrodes of the device and the photoactive material. An ideal interlayer should combine several desirable characteristics that include; low cost, chemical stability, optical transparency, appropriate energy level alignment with the active material, and compatibility with low-temperature and large-area processing methods. Due to the numerous requirements, the choice of readily available HTL & ETL materials still remain limited. In this talk I will discuss the development of alternative HTL/ETL technologies that combine several attractive characteristics including, processing versatility and extreme optical transparency with strictly selective charge carrier transport. I will show how the use of such unconventional materials enable the facile manufacturing of high performance optoelectronics including solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes, while at the same time pave the way to novel device concepts.

Auditorium between Building 4 and 5 14:00 - 14:30 Details