Perovskite/Hybrid Photovoltaics

​Project 5: High-efficiency printed perovskite solar cell devices

PI: Aram Amassian, Stefaan De Wolf, Jr-Hau He 

This project’s overall aim is to develop large-area compatible fabrication methods for high-performance solar cells using emerging hybrid perovskite material systems. These systems will include mixed cations and mixed halides (Amassian, De Wolf), as well as reduced dimensionality perovskites, such as 2D and mixed 2D/3D systems (Hau, Amassian, Laquai). The team will together establish ink-process-structure-property-performance relationship for hybrid lead halide perovskites, including through the development of contactless J-V curve measurements (De Wolf), then translate these lessons to scalable processes, such as blade-coating and wire-bar coating, with the aim of achieving PCE > 19% for 3D perovskites and PCE > 12% for 2D perovskites.


Project 6: Printed hybrid-tandem solar cells and modules

PI: Stefaan De Wolf, Aram Amassian 

This project aims at developing perovskite solar cells with wide bandgap (1.7 eV) and semi-transparent contacts that can be combined with silicon solar cells, with as ultimate goal the fabrication of tandem solar cells with very high efficiency (power conversion efficiency, PCE >30%). All needed components in terms of perovskite device fabrication and characterization will be developed in this project. In a later stage, these devices will be monolithically integrated into 2-terminal perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells. For full application flexibility, the focus is on low-temperature processed tandem cells.wide bandgap (1.7 eV) and semi-transparent contacts that can be combined with silicon solar cells, with as ultimate goal the fabrication of tandem solar cells with very high efficiency (power conversion efficiency, PCE >30%). All needed components in terms of perovskite device fabrication and characterization will be developed in this project. In a later stage, these devices will be monolithically integrated into 2-terminal perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells. For full application flexibility, the focus is on low-temperature processed tandem cells.

The activity on quantum dot based tandem systems will be stopped for FY 2017-18, and will be replaced by an activity on developing narrow-band-gap perovskite solar cells (ideal band gap around 1 eV), with as goal perovskite-perovskite tandem solar cells. 2017-18, and will be replaced by an activity on developing narrow-band-gap perovskite solar cells (ideal band gap around 1 eV), with as goal perovskite-perovskite tandem solar cells. 


Project 7: Efficient single‐semiconductor solar cells

PI: Thomas Anthopoulos, Frederic Laquai

In this project we will first develop high efficiency (>10%) SMOSCs and secondly attempt to elucidate the operating principles of best-performing, fullerene-based SMOSCs by means of advanced photophysical characterization techniques including all-optical techniques such as ultrafast broadband transient absorption (TA), time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy, and electro-optical experiments such as time-delayed collection field (TDCF) and time-delayed double pump (TDDP) experiments. The very fundamental questions which we want to address within the project are: 

  1. how is the free charge generation process in SMOSCs different from BHJ devices,
  2. does carrier recombination in the absence of a heterojunction follow traditional Langevin-type recombination or can we observe reduced non-geminate recombination,
  3. what is the role of charge-transfer states in SMOSCs, are they intermediates of free charge carrier or a terminal loss channel? 

Finally, we will answer what limits the efficiency in operating devices by addressing questions such as: what determines the fill factor in devices, that is, is it i) field-dependent generation (investigated by TDCF), or ii) a competition of carrier extraction and non-geminate recombination (investigated by the TDDP technique to be developed and advanced in this project), or iii) a combination of both. 

In parallel to the photophysical studies on the above-mentioned fullerene-based devices, we will search and identify a range of other suitable OSCs readily available within KAUST.  Materials to be revisited include state-of-the-art high charge carrier mobility ambipolar polymers and small molecules in combination with a range of recently developed HTL and ETL based on organic and inorganic pristine/doped materials.


Project 8: Advanced hole extraction layers for printed photovoltaics 

PI: Thomas Anthopoulos, Iain McCulloch

The primary aim of this work is the development of solution processable and highly transparent hole-extraction material systems with tunable charge carrier concentration. The research will focus on two key activities:

  1. development of soluble and environmentally-stable molecular dopants with characteristically low LUMO energies, and
  2. use of these systems for doping of state-of-the-art organics and inorganic hole transporting semiconducting materials.  



​​​

Related Publications